What is the Value of the Written Word: Part II

images-8Part I was the response to the literal question. When we make a living writing and editing, we have to put an objective, concrete value on our words in order to survive and thrive. But that should be just a necessary evil. Today, we will visit the figurative or philosophical aspect of the query. So, business aside, what about the value of words gauged by other means? Do they have a measurable effect on us and our quality of life just as a paycheck related to these words might?

Words themselves are priceless and enduring. The carefully chosen ones produce life-changing insight, poetry, beauty, and enlightenment. The wrong ones may cause personal harm and wreak havoc on our souls, create unnecessary confusion, or set off  a chain of miscommunication and permanent damage. So, there is power in how we use our language, but so many people don’t consider this. Nor do they consider that learning how to structure our verbal interactions is of vital importance.

College students taking required composition classes most often treat their writing assignments as a burden and as something to be gotten past. They don’t realize the power they have when they wield their language artfully and strategically. There is grace in touching someone with words of significance. This is part of the overall struggle we in the humanities have when fighting to maintain respect and funding for Liberal Studies.

The “value” in communicating clearly is immeasurable. If you are still stuck on the financial side of “value,” then understand that poorly written missives don’t even get you onto the ladder of success, much less up any rungs. You’d better hope you are so brilliant otherwise and that you will be in so much demand that you can afford a personal assistant to mask your failings in this arena.

The real value, I think, is in what your words will do for others as well as for yourself.

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What is the Value of the Written Word: Part I

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Good question, right? But I want to ask you also: Are you thinking the same about “value” as I am? There are many answers to this so I chose to write this in segments. The first one, here, is in terms of monetary value and the life of a working writer. I will be following up with more segments that address “value” in other forms. Please feel free to let me know if you have anything to add or even argue.

Quite recently I was re-negotiating a contract with a publisher because I was going to rewrite a few brief sections of a book that I originally was only going to edit. Nothing fancy, just a couple of paragraphs. We haggled over a few cents per word. Now, the original editor told me politely why I would not get my preferred pay rate (they don’t know me yet). Not that they are stiffing me by any means–their pay is fair, but I now push for the higher end of the scale because, well, I’ve been doing this a long time. The other editor on the project really pushed my buttons. I got the “someone else will do it cheaper” bit. Really? Well, yes they will. And, as I told him diplomatically but clearly, he’ll get what they pay for. Seeing that they weren’t budging and I’d been treated quite well otherwise (Note: I’ve not had to deal with the petulant unprofessional guy since) I figured true, they don’t know me yet, I’d give a little here.

If they had treated me poorly from the start, even the middle-ground pay would not be enough. There is a going rate per word, per page, per hour, and per project and you should always look up what that is in your field, by region, by type of publication, by level of experience. Are you contract or freelance? Are you signing a noncompete contract that limits your marketability elsewhere? Are you on retainer, full pay at time of completion of project, half at the start and half later? All of these should come into your calculations as to whether or not a job is worth the effort. ALL should include contracts with a clause regarding compensation for cancelled projects.

So, value your work, and make sure others honor that value with fair pay and fair contracts. Taking less out of insecurity or the desire to be able to call yourself a “real” writer devalues your efforts and puts your colleagues at financial risk as well.