Yoga, Writing, and Who You Really Are

A friend of mine just e-mailed an article to me that discusses what your favorite yoga poses tell you about yourself. Never mind the obvious issues of being in shape or still learning, because even something new or difficult can be stimulating to pursue. So what you decide to keep working on very well may tell you what you need or want in life in general.

I avoid side plank and am afraid of many inversions and don’t keep at them as much. But there are other poses that are difficult that I don’t avoid. Hmmm.

Those of you who know my work know then that this will continue on to a discussion of writing. And what does your writing say about you? I should ask first what does your reading say about you? Really, do you reach for People at the dentist’s office or Time? Do you buy books you think you should read while really wanting  to read something else? Either way, why?

I found myself today reaching to buy a book I thought I should read because I had been neglecting my studies in Irish literature. I wanted to read Neil Gaiman’s latest book of short stories. Gaiman won out. Who’s going to penalize me? After all, I dabble in the short story myself. How am I going to learn and improve if I don’t read the masters? I am not talking only of the members of the  literary cannon, but those whom I believe to be worthy of the title of master. Frankly, some writers are not to my taste and, no matter what their status in the literary community, I don’t prefer to read them–yet (or again). So do I not appreciate the writers I avoid or am I not ready to experience them fully? Can I fully embrace and engage in the profession of writing if I only read what I want instead of including what I should? You are wondering why I am not mentioning other authors’ names. This is simply because I want you to focus more on yourself and  your own questions about investigation and experience than debating my taste or choices. I’d rather you ask yourself about your choices and aversions and see where that leads.

As you read the article, see if you find out something new about yourself through your yoga practice. If you don’t practice yoga or not regularly, insert genres or authors in place of the poses and see what you find out about yourself.

http://life.gaiam.com/article/what-does-your-favorite-yoga-pose-say-about-you

I’m interested in your reactions  . . .

 

Writing Update and Plot Issues: My Problems Wordiness and Vocabulary

I very much liked this blog post and wanted to share it with all of you who are either in their first stages of writing and are trying to emulate some of the greats, or who have already been there and may laugh at yourself, again, when you read this.

thewriterscafe247

AT LAST I HAVE RETURNED TO THE LAND OF THE LIVING!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Forgive me if I seem a bit overdramatic, but I feel like I have just come out of a three month long hibernation. After endless bouts of power outages, snow shovels and sub-zero temperatures I am ecstatic to say that SPRING IS HERE!!!!!!! *applause and fireworks*

WINTER IS OVER!!!!!!!!!! YAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAY!!!! WINTER IS OVER!!!!!!!!!! YAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAY!!!!

When I was at college during my freshman year I got stuck for ideas when I was working on an essay and I gave myself five or ten minutes to work on a freewriting prompt which was completely unrelated to my essay. When my time was up after the first time I had about three pages of a story started, Through all of my years at college and the time after whenever I would find myself mentally stuck I go back to my old standby and add to it…

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All Experience is Relevant to All of Our Creativity

No experience is ever a waste. If you make an effort to understand your behavior in the context of the cause-and-effect pattern of our world, you can see, in your own time, how you come to react to events physically, emotionally, spiritually, and psychologically. Never one to blame the victim or settle for this unfocused “everything happens for a reason” catchphrase, I do hold to the idea that we make very specific choices that lead to the encounter in question. No, you did not give yourself cancer, or “ask” to be victimized in a robbery, or shunned by people who disagree with you. But you chose to go to the doctor and get a diagnoses. You chose to exercise your right to walk outside alone  or voice your opinion. Within these actions, someone or some people made their choices.

Your job is to dissect the experience and figure out what to take away from the moment. Be thankful you got the diagnoses when you did. You could make the plans that save you or keep you in control of your care. Be mindful that you have the right to function unmolested and the perpetrator is at fault. Even If you have voiced opinions and viewpoints with respect and compassion, frankness and certitude, couldn’t someone still potentially have an issue with them? The presentation may be well done but not everyone has the ability to receive the content with measured, objective analysis. If you were rude or inappropriate, well . . .

OK, you ask, where does this fit into your overall theme of writing? Nope, it’s not just recording the events or remembering the emotions for your characters that may be placed in this scenario. This is for your personal as well as professional well being. How do stories come to you? How do job contacts come to you? How do you filter the world around you so that experiences can be treasured as affirmation of your strengths and value? Not indignation and proof of being “right,” but proof of being here as you. And how do these realizations undergo a kind of transformation into text.

These acknowledgments affect your tone and your choice of subject matter. You reject or accept your responses to and feelings about the world when you write. My own longing for a sense of relevance and worth today has pushed my ego into the fore and pushed me to reach out here, now. If I were not disappointed in having opened myself to public rudeness because I was trusting and assumed that someone I did not know would have integrity (see my post Kindness in Writing), I would not be admonishing you to be mindful and careful about your writing self. Ultimately, since there was nothing illegal or permanently damning in my recent  experience that might require overt confrontation and action, it became a platform for reflection and this post is my catharsis. My choice to filter the experience in a healthy way.

I wish all experiences could be so easily resolved and that I had the wisdom and fortitude to regularly forgive others their unkindness, folly, and unprofessional acts, and myself my own wrong choices and mistakes. But, that is why we call yoga a practice and our writing will need revisions.